Salvador Dali exhibition

Salvador Dalí Exhibition

An exhibition of Salvador Dalí’s artwork is currently open in the exhibition hall of the Convent of St. Claire in Dubrovnik. The unique exhibition features a series of Dalí’s prints, including the graphic opuses “The Divine Comedy” (1964) and “Biblia Sacra” (1967), which offer a glimpse into the artist’s perspective on the Bible and Dante’s The Divine Comedy. These works have a special place in Dalí’s opus because of the techniques used.
When he died in 1989, Dalí left behind a collection of close to 1,700 graphic prints, some of which are considered among the best examples of 20th century print making. He created these using a variety of techniques, including engraving, woodcut, gravure printing, lithography and mixed media, and explored a wide range of topics, including literary works such as Don Quixote, The Decameron, Alice in Wonderland, Faust, Tristan and Isolde, and The Old Man and the Sea. The works on display in Dubrovnik were created during what some consider was the golden age of Dalí’s prints. The exhibition presents a diverse selection of the artist’s works, including more than 130 prints dating from the period from 1964 to 1967, 70 graphic prints, Dalí’s statue of Dante Alighieri and a decomposition of a wood carving of “The Divine Comedy.”
The exhibition, which was previously seen by more than 100,000 people in several cities, was brought to Dubrovnik by the Slovenian gallerist David Rjazancev. It opened in early April and closes on November 29.

Convent of St. Claire

The Convent of St. Claire, which houses the exhibition, is the best known of eight convents in Dubrovnik. It is located next to the Great Onofrio Fountain, near the south side of the Pile Gates, the entrance into the Old Town on its western wall.
Built in the late 13th and early 14th century, the convent served as an orphanage for abandoned and illegitimate children from 1432 until the French administration took over during Napoleon’s rule and closed down the convent. The orphanage was one of the first institutions of its kind in the world. The French turned the convent into a weapons warehouse and a horse stable. After World War II, the building was turned into a restaurant and an open-air cinema, and today it serves multiple purposes.

Dubrovnik accommodation

Visitors looking for spacious luxury rooms with stunning sea views on the Dubrovnik riviera can book their stay at the recently opened Sheraton Hotel in the village of Srebreno. Located in a secluded bay only 5 minutes from Dubrovnik, the Sheraton Dubrovnik Riviera Hotel offers premium accommodation, rooms with balconies overlooking the sea, and excellent Croatian and international cuisine and drinks at the hotel’s restaurants and bars. Facilities at the hotel include a wellness and spa centre and heated indoor and outdoor pools, and services available to guests include rent-a-car, the planning of special events and receptions, and help with organizing day trips and excursions to the surrounding area. Opened as a luxury resort in August 2015, the Sheraton welcomes guests throughout the year.
Image: Dubrovnik.hr